Erik Buch Bar Stool

Erik Buch Bar Stool Review
Erik Buch Bar Stool

The Bar Stool that launched a thousand cocktails

You could say Danish mid-century designer Erik Buch’s most famous work is the Bar Stool that launched a thousand copyists. 

Last update on 2020-09-27 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

It was a popular choice amongst Scandi enthusiasts a long time before it starred in Don and Megan’s sixties apartment in Mad Men.

Not just because of the lip that lifts seductively at the back keeping you firmly in your seat, or the legs that refuse to break no matter how much they get dropped or kicked. 

As the patina deepens these stools just get better and better with age.

Buch created over thirty successful designs during his career, but none so famous as his Bar Stools. The teak Bar Stools with the rosewood step are the model most dealers’ eye up. 

Teak is easier to repair than rosewood, takes a lick of Danish oil beautifully and develops a deep orangey brown colour over time. Rosewood can be harder to repair. 

Spot one with screws on the outside of the legs? It is most definitely a fake.

The only screws you should see on a genuine Buch Bar Stool are bored deep into holes underneath the seat. 

The side bars will have a faint pattern, known as a finger-joint, where the wood curves up to meet the vertical legs and under the seat. 

The back and front bars will sit lower with a slightly curved rosewood step for your feet.

TAPA Interior designers Roman and Williams chose originals for the Viceroy Hotel rooftop bar in New York and to work in beautiful contrast with the cool steel of the bar at Japanese restaurant Izakaya in Amsterdam’s Sir Albert Hotel.

The more dedicated Buch fan might prefer to go the whole hog and source Buch’s small stand-alone teak and glass bar with its bottle rack, glass-fronted cupboards and pull-out stainless-steel bowls and cutting board to match the stools in an office or domestic setting. 

No wonder Buch originally created vinyl for the seats of his Bar Stools. Cocktail hour in the sixties went on all day; at some point it was bound to get messy.

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Written by Simon
I am a published writer, journalist and photo-journalist. I have an MA in Creative Writing and Journalism from the University of Wales and my journalism has been published in a number of UK national newspapers including 'the Observer'. I have life long interest in creative design, art and function and this website is an exploration of that in all its forms and guises.