Alvar Aalto Furniture Designs for Herman Miller

Paimio Chair by A. Aalto
Paimio Chair by A. Aalto

Alvar Aalto was born in Finland in 1898. He studied architecture at Helsinki University of Technology, setting up his own architecture practice in 1923. In 1935 he and his wife Aino founded a furniture manufacturing company, Artek. Aalto is best known for his bent plywood and laminated wood furniture, such as the cantilevered “No. 31” chair (1930–1). 

Alvar Aalto
Alvar Aalto

Alvar Aalto designed a number of items for Herman Miller Inc including Chairs, Armchairs, Stools and tea trolleys, a number of which are listed below.

These listings are the original product features and design stories for the Herman Miller designs (and earlier designs) by Alvar Aalto. We have kept them as complete as possible, despite this resulting in a lot of repetition.

Herman Miller: Aalto Lounge Chair 43

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Lounge Chair 43

  • Lie back and relax in style in this classic of modern design. Introduced in 1936-37, Alvar Aalto used his revolutionary technique for bending birch to create the graceful, cantilevered base and frame. Cross rails are solid birch.
  • Innovative Design 
  • Comfortable seat. The webbed suspension is made of linen and provides aeration.
  • Receptive feel. Aalto opened his closed loop models, like the Armchair 41, to create this cantilevered wooden frame.
  • Room to relax. The chaise is 63 1/2″ deep and 25 1/2″ wide. 
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Choice of webbing. Black and natural linen as well as black leather are available.
  • Light-scale look. The lounge has a trim, striking profile and open design that fits well in contemporary spaces.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for everyone used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminates are 3-mm thick, so fewer plies and less glue are used.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Lounge Chair 43

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to mold white birch into organic, curvilinear shapes and express his vision on a mass-produced scale.

The idea of opening up his closed loop frame so that it could provide a springiness similar to that of cantilevered, tubular chairs was simple to formulate, but difficult to achieve. The first satisfactory results were reached when the tubular base of a child’s chair was translated into a base of laminated birch. 

An adult chair with a springy base of wood was shown for the first time in Helsinki, Finland in 1932. It required a continuous 96″ length of birch to achieve the strength and aesthetic. The Lounge Chair 43 is one of many subsequent designs where Aalto applied the cantilevered birch frame. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

Aalto Chair 65 and 66

In 1933-35, Alvar Aalto combined a simple seat and back with his innovative L-leg made of solid birch with a laminated 90-degree bend. The result is a stackable and affordable chair that remains a favorite in contemporary settings, from children’s rooms, dining rooms, to board rooms.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Chair 65 and 66

  • Practical Design 
  • Simple and sturdy. The seat has a solid birch core with birch laminate and face material; the back is molded birch plywood.
  • Two sizes. Chair 65 has a standard back; Chair 66 has a high back.
  • Compact footprint. The standard-back size is 13 1/2″ wide and 15 1/2″ deep; high back is 15 1/2″ wide and 16 1/2″ deep.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Choice of seats. Available in birch, white, or black.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminated 3-mm layers are only used where the leg bends; the rest is solid wood.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story Aalto Chair 65 and 66

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical, and natural, for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. 

So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a mass-produced scale.

Aalto believed his most significant discovery in furniture design was the L-leg. He sawed open the end of a piece of solid birch in the direction of the fibres and glued thin pieces of wood into the grooves. Then he was able to bend the wood to 90 degrees. 

Aalto used the L-leg on a number of designs for tables, stools, and beds as well as chairs. This was consistent with his design philosophy. His furniture designs were largely based on the development of basic components applied to a wide range of models. And he believed the furniture leg is the most important component.

Originally designed for a library in Finland, these chairs are one of Aalto’s best-known creations. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

Herman Miller: Aalto Armchair 400

At the Milan Triennial in 1936, Alvar Aalto unveiled his design for this historic easy chair. The seat lets you relax in comfort, with its solid wood frame, metal springs, and upholstered foam.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Armchair 400

  • Innovative Design 
  • Wide, sturdy armrests. Made of bent, laminated birch.
  • Receptive feel. Aalto opened his closed-loop models, like the Armchair 41, to create this cantilevered design.
  • Generous size. The seat is 33 1/2″ deep, 30″ wide, and 15″ high–great for lounging.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Zebra print. This fun upholstery adds dramatic flair to the simple chair shape; other upholstery options are also available.
  • Handsome profile. With its low-slung look and solid shape, the chair was affectionately nicknamed the “tank.”
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminates are 3-mm thick, so fewer plies and less glue are used.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Armchair 400

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to mold birch into organic, curvilinear shapes.

The idea of opening up his closed loop frame so that it could provide a springiness similar to that of cantilevered, tubular chairs was simple to formulate, but difficult to achieve. The first satisfactory results were reached when the tubular base of a child’s chair was translated into a base of laminated birch. An adult chair with a springy base of wood was shown for the first time in Helsinki, Finland in 1932. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

The Armchair 400 is one of his most successful designs, and it is part of Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection

Herman Miller: Aalto Armchair 406

Introduced in 1938-39, the popular Armchair 406 has a laminated, cantilevered birch frame with solid birch cross-rails. It’s lightweight and easy to manoeuvre, as well as strong and durable–a comfortable chair for guests in a living room, lounge, or waiting area.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Armchair 406

  • Unique Design 
  • Comfortable seat. The webbed suspension is made of linen and framed in laminated birch; the seat and back are shaped to provide a slight recline; the web provides aeration.
  • Receptive feel. Aalto opened his closed-loop models, like the Armchair 41, to create this cantilevered design.
  • Ample size. The seat is 28″ deep and 25″ wide, with a high back (34″). 
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Choice of webbing. Black and natural linen are available.
  • Contemporary look. With its trim profile and open design, the chair is a classic of modern design.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminates are 3-mm thick, so fewer plies and less glue are used.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Armchair 406

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to mold birch into organic, curvilinear shapes.

The idea of opening up his closed loop frame so that it could provide a springiness similar to that of cantilevered, tubular chairs was simple to formulate, but difficult to achieve. 

The first satisfactory results were reached when the tubular base of a child’s chair was translated into a base of laminated birch. An adult chair with a springy base of wood was shown for the first time in Helsinki, Finland in 1932. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

The Armchair 406 is part of Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection.

Herman Miller: Aalto Chair 611

One of the earliest of Alvar Aalto’s classic furniture designs, this armless, solid birch chair has been in production since 1929. Use it as a dining, side, or occasional chair in all kinds of contemporary spaces.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Chair 611

  • Innovative Design 
  • Comfortable seat and back. The webbed suspension is made of linen and provides aeration. Also available in wood and other upholstery options.
  • Stacks up. The chairs are stackable up to eight high to help conserve space when not in use.
  • Compact footprint. The chair is 19″ wide and 19 1/4″ deep.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Choice of webbing. Black and natural linen are available as well as other wood and upholstery options. 
  • Practical look. The chair has a simple, straightforward form and clean lines.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Chair 611

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a mass-produced scale.

Aalto used his ground-breaking methods to create innovative, functional furniture for the Paimio Sanatorium in Finland, which he also designed. 

Among the most famous of these furniture pieces is the general-purpose 611 chair. Unlike typical hospital furnishings, the chair exudes warmth and humanity, which made it a popular design for homes as well. 

With this and other early designs, Aalto helped break down obsolete conventions of living and define the design of a modern home. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

Herman Miller: Aalto High Stool K65

Design Story of the Aalto High Stool K65

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a mass-produced scale.

Aalto believed his most significant discovery in furniture design was the L-leg. He sawed open the end of a piece of solid birch in the direction of the fibres and glued thin pieces of wood into the grooves. Then he was able to bend the wood to 90 degrees. 

Aalto used the L-leg on a number of designs for tables, chairs, and beds as well as stools. This was consistent with his design philosophy. His furniture designs were largely based on the development of basic components applied to a wide range of models. And he believed the furniture leg is the most important component.

Aalto Stool 60 and E60

Alvar Aalto’s used his innovative, solid birch L-legs for the first time on this historic stool, introduced in 1932-33. Since then, the success of the simple design has been proven by the stool’s lasting popularity. Available with three or four legs.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Stool 60 and E60

  • Practical Design 
  • Made to stack. Stools stack as high as you can reach. 
  • Simple and sturdy. The seat has a solid birch core with birch laminate and face material.
  • Compact footprint. The stool top diameter is 13 3/4″.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Color choice. The seat can be birch, black, red, or white.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminated layers are only used where the leg bends; the rest is solid wood.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Stool 60 and E60

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a broad scale.

Aalto believed his most significant discovery in furniture design was the L-leg. He sawed open the end of a piece of solid birch in the direction of the fibres and glued thin pieces of wood into the grooves. Then he was able to bend the wood to 90 degrees. 

Aalto used the L-leg on a number of designs for chairs, stools, and beds as well as tables. This was consistent with his design philosophy. His furniture designs were largely based on the development of basic components applied to a wide range of models. And he believed the furniture leg is the most important component.

When testing the durability of his stool, Aalto hurled it to the floor and shouted, “We’ll sell thousands of these!” Turns out more than 1.5 million have been sold around the world. To this day, his simple, functional, and beautiful designs fit right in.

Herman Miller: Aalto Extension Table H92

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Extension Table H92

  • Practical Design 
  • Lightweight and sturdy. The table combines a solid wood frame with a honeycomb core.
  • Three widths. Using the leaves, the table can be 51 1/4″, 71″, or 90 3/4″; depth is 35 1/2″.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Contemporary look. With clean, honest lines and H-leg, the table is a classic of modern design.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Extension Table H92

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a broad scale.

In 1955, Alvar Aalto completed the design of the Finnish National Pension Institute in Helsinki. Included in this project was a series of H-leg contract table desks using a new metal leg-attachment bracket screwed under the tabletop. The sturdy H-leg is used primarily to support large tables.

Aalto called a furniture leg “the column’s little sister.” By discovering new leg constructions, he changed the style of his furniture just as clearly as the Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian columns each resulted in a special style of architecture.

Aalto Table 83 and 84

The leg of this table, introduced in 1933, marks a breakthrough in modern furniture design. The “L-leg” invented by Aalto is solid birch with a laminated 90-degree bend. With its simple lines, the table works well in both residential and commercial environments.

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Table 83 and 84

  • Innovative Design 
  • Lightweight and sturdy. The frame is solid birch for strength; the top has a honeycomb core.
  • Comfortable sizes. Available 47 1/4″ square or rectangular (71 5/8″ long by 35 7/8″ deep by 28″ high).
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Top choice. Both table shapes can be ordered with birch veneer tops; rectangular tops also come in white laminate, and square tops in black and white laminate; the edge banding is birch laminate.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminated layers are only used where the leg bends; the rest is solid wood.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Table 83 and 84

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a broad scale.

Aalto believed his most significant discovery in furniture design was the L-leg. He sawed open the end of a piece of solid birch in the direction of the fibres and glued thin pieces of wood into the grooves. Then he was able to bend the wood to 90 degrees. 

Aalto used the L-leg on a number of designs for chairs, stools, and beds as well as tables. This was consistent with his design philosophy. His furniture designs were largely based on the development of basic components applied to a wide range of models. And he believed the furniture leg is the most important component.

Aalto Tea Trolley 900 and 901

This personal and elegant piece of furniture is a landmark of modern design–and a highly functional addition to a dining room or kitchen. Introduced in 1937 at the Paris World’s Fair, the charming tea trolleys feature Alvar Aalto’s innovative side frames made of molded, laminated birch. 

Features and Benefits of the Aalto Tea Trolley 900 and 901

  • Innovative Design 
  • Strong, light frames. Thick layers of birch are formed into indented closed loops and cut into narrow sections.
  • Practical elements. Both tea trolleys have large white wheels with black rubber tread; the handle and edge banding are solid birch; Tea Trolley 900 features a rattan basket and a ceramic tiled surface; 901 has shelves with black linoleum or white laminate surfaces.
  • Distinctive Aesthetic 
  • Elegant form. With its curved birch frame, the trolley has a refined, contemporary look.
  • Beautiful patina. Birch ages gracefully, taking on a rich, honey color. 
  • Environmentally Sound 
  • Good wood. Birch is a nontropical, renewable resource; two birch trees are planted for every one used in the production of Aalto furniture.
  • Less waste, less glue. Laminates are 3-mm thick, so fewer plies and less glue are used.
  • Handcrafted. Less industrial processing is needed.
  • Durable. Aalto furniture is built to last from generation to generation. 

Design Story of the Aalto Tea Trolley 900 and 901

Alvar Aalto began designing furnishing in the late 1920s as a natural extension of his architectural projects. To Aalto, a piece of furniture was not simply an isolated object. He saw furniture as part of a harmonious interior. In fact, he described furniture and architecture as branches of the same tree.

Born in Finland in 1898, invoking nature was typical–and natural–for Aalto. Finland’s forests and lake landscapes were an unending source of inspiration and spiritual renewal for him. Nature offered countless themes to which he applied his own interpretation. 

From this philosophical foundation, he and a handful of fellow designers started a movement against what they viewed as the dehumanizing impact of the Machine Age. So, he posed what was considered a radical alternative. He brought a human perspective to design and, in the process, became a pioneer of modernism. His message: aesthetics and functionality belong to all.

Yet Aalto did not turn his back on technology. Rather, he viewed art and technology as inextricably linked and developed innovative production methods that allowed him to express his vision on a broad scale.

In 1930, Alvar Aalto began to saw, bend, split, stretch, join, and glue laminated wood in all kinds of ways in order to create a new kind of furniture. 

Ultimately, he used birch, which was plentiful in Finland. He glued 3-mm-thick layers of bent birch slats together into an elegant, rounded side frame, which was used to create many historic products, including the tea trolley, part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

Avatar
Written by Simon
I am a published writer, journalist and photo-journalist. I have an MA in Creative Writing and Journalism from the University of Wales and my journalism has been published in a number of UK national newspapers including 'the Observer'. I have life long interest in creative design, art and function and this website is an exploration of that in all its forms and guises.